I finished the trailer (I guess) and now commencing phase two (of five hundred and seventy-two) of my editing career (which I think now includes writing and directing to some degree how many words can I make this blog title before it starts doing that thing where the letters turn red? I wonder what would happen if I write an entire post in the title. Tune in next time on Sonja doesn’t know what she’s doing.com).

I did it!

My trailer for Editfest is done!

Tadah!

If you like voting you’ll love this link right here! Aw yeah boiiii.


So, my post post thoughts in a blog post;

This was a major learning curve as evidenced by my previous posts that were entirely about trailer and how to cut one.

I’m proud that I a) got something finished and b) don’t hate it BUT honestly it is lacking a lot of elements and finesse. Luckily I am aware of the artistic process and skill development learning curve so I don’t want to fling myself gracefully off a tall building. Just a short building… Or a ledge perhaps.

No, no. I kid. It actually makes me more determined than ever. Now I have a starting point to work from. And that is good. Plus it was extraordinarily fulfilling to do, learning new technical skills (like slightly interesting creative color grading) and working my way around Premier Pro. I think my favourite thing, which has sparked a bit of a new path inside me was finding a story to tell. Then figuring out a way to convey that story idea with some kind of ‘mood’.

Additionally, because this was a more personal project and not a work project, I got to ‘play’ with it which gave me a lot more opportunity to try things out and see if they worked or didn’t work, as well as hone a bit of an artistic voice. This, I think, is something I’ll carry with me into future projects, personal and otherwise. Having a voice as an editor. Very, very important.

This leads in tidily to the second part of my post title.

I’ve begun writing a short film idea. I’d say script but it’s not that advanced yet. It’s still currently in ‘I just threw some alphabet spaghetti on the ground’ phase. But it’s an idea I’m enjoying and, perhaps because I think in vivid imagery, it’s fun to ‘watch’ in my mind. I’m enjoying the process of seeing what the short will look like and how it will be shot and cut and the moments I’ll get to create in it. It’s something I’d like to pursue, even if it’s just as a side project, getting into writing and perhaps directing. Although, I do worry I’m introducing too many learning curves into my life at once. YOLO I guess.

As far as editing goes. My next project I’m creating for myself is to recut No Country For Old Men into a short. I chose that particular movie because it doesn’t have a soundtrack AND I’m curious to see if I can change the mood from something quietly dramatic to something almost awkward and uncomfortable, in a ‘The Office’ kind of way. There’s something quite enjoyable and personally satisfying about mixing unrelated themes (in this case, slightly irreverent humor and scary murder sociopath).

In closing, having a learning curve is fun and deeply gratifying, finishing things (or atleast, submitting things) is confidence boosting, and working on things with a sense of freedom and reverie and discovery is the best feeling in the whole world.

Learning curvingly yours,

Sonja x

Re-hashing the basics of Premier Pro and thinking about movie trailers.

Bonjour and goodmorning!

This post will be covering a little about how I’m approaching my submission for Editfest (check out my last post here to know what I’m talking about!).


To begin;

I’ll be cutting a movie trailer using entirely stock footage from Film Supply and graphics I make in After Effects. I’ve been using the Adobe Suite for a while so it’s all fairly familiar BUT I’d really like to take this opportunity to get into the nitty-gritty of these programs. I’ve never really given myself the time to explore Premier Pro and all it’s features so I’ll be spending a lot of time honing my technical skills while I cut together this trailer.

I’ll be doing so with this free little intro course I found on Udemy:

PREMIER PRO 101

And this mighty 4.5 hour tutorial I found on Youtube:

Learn EVERYTHING about Premiere Pro | TUTORIAL

This should cover all the most basic of basics, which seems tedious but I want tthe software I use to feel like an extension of my body so it’s worth covering EVERYTHING from the ground up. I want to really KNOW Premier Pro. You know?


Regarding actually cutting a trailer, I’ve been using this video as a reference to get started (since I’ve never cut a trailer and I want to fill my brain with as much juice as possible):

The very first point is ‘tell a story’, which seems very ‘well, duh’, but on watching some submissions other people have made to Editfest it is actually quite overlooked! Also, it is kind of fun to just throw a whole smattering of pretty shots together over some pretty music and feel satisfied at the brilliant moody collage of feelings you’ve created. However, that does not a movie trailer make. Alas.

The challenge, for me at this point, is taking stock footage and no actual film script, and building a story to tell.

I think my best approach (which I’ve been working on already) is to take two or three ‘scenes’ from the available footage and formulate a narrative around them. That way there is some coherence between both the footage and the shooting style so it seems to be all connected in some kind of a way. You’ll have to watch the movie to figure out HOW they are connected though… If all goes well the trailer will create that desire!


That’s all for today.

I have editing and learning to do!

Thank you for reading AS ALWAYS.

Editingly yours,

Sonja x